Rep. of Korea

The Korean government has launched a $65 million pilot program on Jeju Island with major players in the industry. The program consists of a fully integrated Smart Grid System for 6000 households; wind farms and four distribution lines are included in the pilot program. This demonstrates the extent of Korea¡¯s commitment towards an environmentally viable future.  

Korea plans to slash overall energy consumption by 3% and cut down total electric energy consumption by 10% before 2030. The government also plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 41 million tons by this time. The government has announced that it will undertake a nation-wide Smart Grid implementation by 2030. 

On January of 2010, Korea has taken a significant step forward in its efforts to grab a foothold in the global smart grid sector, inking a tentative deal with Illinois to jointly develop and test technologies for smart grid. The two parties have signed a memorandum of understanding with the Illinois Department of Commerce to set up a pilot program to create smart grid technology at a facility on Jeju Island. Under the plan, technologies that are developed through this partnership and are deemed viable for commercialization will be rolled out both in Illinois as well as in Korean cities. The two sides agreed to launch a business model for a smart grid on Jeju-do Island and apply it in Seoul and Chicago later on.  The Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute and other related local centers will come together with Illinois' Argonne National Laboratory and Chicago University to test and develop technologies.   

A joint cooperation committee will be established to draw up a detailed cooperation program for the next three years. The Korean government seeks to complete the installment of smart grid in the country by 2030 and establish another 27,000 or more power charge stations for electric cars. A total of 27.5 trillion won will be injected according to the roadmap. The government plans to handle it by developing core technology, new markets, new infrastructure and attracting voluntary investment from businesses.
 

U.S 
 

In the United States, the reliability of the electrical system (due to under-investment in the infrastructure), growing demand and the increasing difficulty of building new transmission infrastructures are the primary drivers for smart grid. Development of smart grid in the United States is being stimulated by the $4.5B USD allocated to grid modernization under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).  The US government is currently pursuing research in promising technologies for smart grid implementation under the Smart Grid Demonstration Program (SGDP), which allocated $100M USD to regional smart grid demonstrations and $515M USD to energy storage demonstrations. In addition, the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) programs allotted $3.3B USD towards the quick integration of proven technologies into existing electric grid infrastructure.  

Demand response initiatives are also a primary driver for US governmental policies. The recently proposed American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 includes a section that mandates load serving entities and state entities to publish peak demand reduction goals. Technology involving reducing capacity by demand response is already being traded in a US wholesale power market (PJM). 

Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) requiring the production of energy from renewable sources have also been adopted under state legislation. Some states have voluntarily adopted RPS even without a federal mandate. Both state and federal agencies have collaborated in identifying Competitive Renewable Energy Zones (CREZ) in regions with high densities of renewable energies to increase profitable development.
 

U.S.¡¯s Smart Meter Installation Estimate (by thousands)

Year

2009

2010

2012

2014

2016

2018

2020

Count

3,800

7,000

10,000

22,000

10,000

3,000

3,000

Cumulative Count

3,800

10,800

20,800

42,800

52,800

55,800

58,800

     Source: Seed Planning     

 

U.S.¡¯s Demand Response Main Cases by States

Period

State

Content

2007. 08

New Jersey

Public Service Electric and Gas Company, completed ToU/CPP testing using regular households. Send electricity price information by utilizing temperature controller consumer provided at no charge.

2007. 12

Oregon

General Electric, Eight hundred and five thousand installation of Smart Meter in condition to request CPP¡¯s charging fee approval request from PUCO(Public Utility Commission of Oregon)

2008

Maryland

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, using 1,000 households as a demonstration, implement CPR (Critical Peak Rebate) system for 4 months

2008. 03

Colorado

Xcel Energy, initiate 1 hundred million scaled smart grid project. Provide Demand Response information using wind energy as the basis.  

2008. 07

Washington D.C

The PowerCentsDC¢â, Installation of household smart meters using 1,200 consumers as test-bed participants. Implement ToU, CPP, Critical Peak Rebate

2008. 07

Dallas, Texas

CCET(Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technology), progress Pilot project related to Peak DR Direct Energy, Reliant Energy, TXU Energy will choose consumers to test on.

    Source: FERC, metering.com    

 

Canada 

As the electricity system is under provincial jurisdiction, ¡°national¡± smart grid implementation will depend on each province. On February of 2009, the state of Ontario declared ¡°Green Energy Act as a comprehensive government policy action. One major project is in Ontario, where the Ontario Energy Board in Canada has mandated a large scale smart grid initiative by upgrading from traditional Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) to Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), a system capable of measuring and analyzing energy usage using two-way communication, throughout the province. The state of Ontario has been actively promoting smart meter since 2007. The state of Ontario plans to implement smart meters in all household by 2010. Current projections of implementing smart grid throughout Canada are at $238B CAN by 2030. Issues of standardization, security, maintenance and regulation remain a concern although continuing talks between President Obama and Prime Minster Harper implicate a definite movement towards smart grid.

Ontario¡¯s AMI Open System

           Source: Ontario Energy Board      

 

   Ontario¡¯s Energy Sector At A Glance

   - Electricity consumers : 4.6 million                                
   - Electricity distributors : 680,000 km2
   - Total service area (sq.km) : 200,000 km Total km of line                    
   - Natural gas consumers : 3.2 million
   - Ontario consumes : 26 % of Canada¡¯s electricity and
                                36 % of Canada¡¯s natural gas                  
   - Ontario produces : 26 % of Canada¡¯s electricity and less than
                               1 % of Canada¡¯s natural g

 

U.K.

The British Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and the regulator Ofgem have published a smart grid routemap comprising a high level description of the way in which a U.K. smart grid could be delivered to contribute to the realization of government carbon targets and end-customer benefits.

The routemap, which was developed by the Electricity Networks Strategy Group (ENSG), is aimed at realizing the U.K.¡¯s smart grid vision. The focus is on three critical smart grid roles for the nation¡¯s planned low carbon transition up to 2050 – the integration of inflexible generation, the electrification of transport and heating, and the integration of distributed energy resources (DER).

The three high level objectives are carbon reduction, energy security, and economic competitiveness and affordability in delivering a cost effective low carbon transition.

Accordingly, four tiers of projects and trials have been identified, with increasing customer interaction, value chain integration and commercial/regulatory development required, as the projects types move from tier 1 to tier 4. The four tiers are:
   1. Individual technology, e.g. dynamic line rating
   2. Multiple integrated technologies, e.g. network monitoring, control and optimization
   3. Customer and technology integration, e.g. distributed generation and ultra low carbon vehicles
       implementation
   4.  End-to-end integration, e.g. intelligent conurbation linking all elements of the value chain.

Source: Metering.com    
http://www.metering.com/i/ensg_routemap_final.pdf    

 

U.K¡¯s Power Production by Energy Source 1991-2006

Source: Eurostat, 2009          

 

France 

In France 78% of power produced is from nuclear power. In addition coal, natural gas, bio-meth and wind power are all various methods used to produce power.
 

France¡¯s Power Production by Energy Source 1991-2006

     Source: Eurostat, 2009         

 

France needs smart grid to stabilize and to efficiently unify dispersed energy supply. France has suggested integrating renewable energy and supplying smart meters to reflect consumer¡¯s demands starting from July 0f 2008. They are also in the process of technology development in the area of electric vehicle and electric vehicle charger. In France, ERDF monopolizes domestic power industry. This can help with centralized investment and efficiency in smart grid, but can intercept with foreign vendors to participate. France¡¯ energy environment public corporation ADME (Agence de l'Environnement et de la Maîtrise de l'Energie) supports electric vehicle technology related research and has created France¡¯s smart grid roadmap. France plans to substitute old fashioned bas and electricity meters to smart meters by 2015 in all households.
 

France¡¯s Smart Meter Installation Estimate (by thousands)

Year

2009

2010

2012

2014

2016

2018

2020

Count

150

150

3,000

15,700

16,000

-

-

Cumulative

150

300

3,300

19,000

35,000

35,000

35,000

Source: Seed Planning     

 

Ecuador

Though a small country, Ecuador is at the forefront in Latin America in terms of Smart Grid developments.

Studies and tests on BPL, begun in several Latin American countries in the late 90s, have experienced several ups and downs due to problems with standards and technological vicissitudes. In 2007-2008, the interest of Latin American utilities shifted to smart grids, especially with a view to reducing electric power theft, a major regional challenge.

In April 2008, BPL Global entered into a partnership with Broadband Powerline Communications Latin America (BPLCLA), a telecom company involved in designing BPL systems for voice, broadband, and television. According to the partnership agreement, BPLCLA became the distributor of BPL Global's smart grid technology in Latin America, a move that did to accelerate smart grid uptake in the region. In September 2008, BPLCLA started to begin operations in Ecuador, where four electricity companies are already active in the development of BPL technology.  

The Empresa Eléctrica Azogues (Emelazogues), which operates in Ecuador¡¯s Cañar province, teamed up with Canadian BPL provider Trimax Corporation in March 2007 to successfully completed a BPL pilot last year. 

Quito-based electricity provider Empresa Electrica Quito (EEQ) signed an agreement in November 2007 with a consortium made up of telecom companies Telconet, Gilauco, and Brightcell (TGB) to jointly offer services using BPL technology. In April 2008, EEQ submitted a request to Conatel for a broadband licence covering the provinces of Pichincha and Santo Domingo. EEQ plans to offer high-speed Internet acces services over a fibre-optic and BPL network reaching 70% of its 700,000 electricity users in Quito. This network is also designed to accommodate for Smart Metering and Smart Grid applications. In July 2008, EEQ and TGB selected Canadian firm Corinex Communications to provide a BPL network spanning over 15,000km of EEQ¡¯s electrical cables and covering 800,000 residents in Quito. Speeds of between 256Kb/s and 1Mb/s were considered to be realistic. Work on the project began immediately, and the companies expected to complete the rollout by the end of next year. 

In January 2008, power utility Transelectric inaugurated a 460km broadband network using BPL technology. The US$28 million fibre-optic cable network is overlaid on Transelectric¡¯s electricity lines covering the Azuay, El Oro, and Loja provinces in the south of Ecuador. This network is utilized for monitoring and control in the transmission grid.
 

Australia

In 2004, the Essential Services Commission of Victoria, Australia (ESC) released its changes to the Electricity Customer Metering Code and the Victorian Electricity Supply Industry Metrology Procedure to implement its decision to mandate interval meters for 2.6 million Victorian electricity customers.

The ESC's Final Paper entitled "Mandatory Rollout of Interval Meters for Electricity Customers" foreshadowed the changes to be implemented and contained the rollout timetable requiring interval meters to be installed for all small businesses and residences. The rollout commenced in mid 2009 and is forecast to be completed by the end of 2013.[18]

The Victorian government is not alone with other state governments and the Commonwealth issuing a Joint Communiqué at the Council of Australian Governments meeting in Canberra on 17 February 2006 committing all governments to the progressive rollout of smart metering technology from 2007 

The Australian government decided to spend $100 million this year on a commercial scale Smart Grid Rollout. The movement exemplifies a series of measures taken towards the installation of the Smart Grid system.  

Smart Grid Australia (SGA) was formed to act as a lobbying group for the implementation of Smart Grid systems. Since its formation the SGA has consulted various firms such as Gridwise USA and Smart Grid Europe to explore research activities. The organization has also linked up with various companies to look into the technical aspects; this demonstrates the increasing levels of interest in the field in Australia.  

Furthermore, the Australian government set up the National Energy Efficiency Initiative (NEEI). The NEEI announced the ¡®Smart Grid, Smart City¡¯ project in 2009, which is to be the first commercial-scale Smart Grid in Australia. The pre-deployment study for this project has been successfully completed, and the bid for the project will take place later this year. The delivery will be through an integrated consortium.  

The Mandatory Renewable Energy Target (MRET) has also contributed to the green movement. The MRET was established on 1 April 2001 to encourage additional generation of renewable energy. The scheme requires wholesale purchasers of electricity to contribute proportionally to an additional 9,500 GWh of renewable energy per year by 2010. By mid 2009, the target generation of renewable energy was achieved and an estimated $5.6 billion has been invested in the field.  

Australia is taking steps towards a greener future. There are further plans of a $2.8 billion investment in South Australia to renew their grid. There are government-mandated Advanced Metering Infrastructure programs and the Solar Initiative Smart Grid. Such steps are likely to improve the efficiency of the overall grid and reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the long run.  
 

Australia¡¯s Smart Meter Installation Estimate (by thousands)

Year

2009

2010

2012

2014

2016

2018

2020

Count

-

132

1,447

921

¡¡-

-

-¡¡

Cumulative Count

-

-

1,579

1,700

1,700

1,700

1,700

Source: Seed Planning     

 

China

In 2002, China established five independent electricity generating companies and several transmission companies. The five generators have an equal share of the assets — China Huaneng, China Datang, China Huadian, Guodian Power, China Power Investment — and compete to sell electricity. The State Grid Corporation of China (SGCC), the Southern Power Grid Corporation and the Eastern China Grid Corporation are among China's transmission companies. The largest utility in the world, SGCC serves 26 provinces and 1.08 billion people with a peak load of 343 gigawatts (GW) and total investment in grid construction valued at US $31.8 billion in 2007. China's second largest utility, China Southern Power Grid, is ranked 226th in Fortune Magazine's Global 500 listing with revenues exceeding US $30 billion.

Throughout China, the existing regional grids have weak interconnections between provinces and largely non-existent interconnections between grids. In order to solve this deficiency, the Chinese government has plans to create a unified national power grid network by 2020.

The plans include what is known as the "West-East Electricity Transfer Project," which requires the construction of three major west-east transmission corridors: North, Central and South. The transmission capacity of each corridor is expected to reach 20 GW by 2020. While planning for such major infrastructure investments, the government would be well-positioned to lay the foundation for "smart grid" capacity across the country.

The Eastern China Grid Corporation initiated a feasibility study of "smart grid" technology in October 2007. Shi Junqing, the General Manager of Eastern China Grid Corp. described the findings earlier this year. In terms of the large load on its grid, the assets that it has built into its system, the necessity of continuing to build out the network and the increasing environmental, safety, reliability and efficiency pressures that it faces, Eastern China Grid Corp. believes that the conditions are now ripe for it to put in place a smart grid system; to that end the company has established a goal of gradually putting in place the elements of a "smart grid" over the coming years

The Chinese government set forth a $586 billion stimulus plan to invest in water systems, rural infrastructures and power grids. One of the most prominent developments initiated by the plan is the Smart Grid system.  

China aims to reduce its overall energy consumption and make the power distribution network more efficient. The target is set to be a 20% cut before the end of 2010. As part of the efforts to reduce energy consumption, Smart Grid systems are being considered. China¡¯s State Grid Corporation has outlined plans with a scheduled pilot program by 2010 and deployment by 2010. A further feasibility study is currently underway and experts from all over the world are investigating into the potential costs and benefits.

The Joint US-China Cooperation on Clean Energy (JUCCCE) was set up, and it has been making efforts to accelerate the process. The organization held the JUCCCE China Energy Forum in 2008, and it continues to work towards a greener China. The Chinese power grid is currently made up of 1.18 million kilometres of old transmission lines that carry around 3 million gigawatts of electricity throughout the country.  Almost 7 percent of that amount is lost from inefficient power transfer.  At the same time the demand for power in the country is expected to double by the year 2020. The government aims for 15% of installed capacity to be sourced from renewable energy by 2020.  

Currently in China vendors such as NARI, Landis& Gyr, EPRI, Wasion and Keli (etc) mainly control China¡¯s smart meter market and they persistently upgrade and substitute old meters. Chinas has initiated starting from 1996 until 2000 to install 1 meter per each households and completed a national power network project for inner cities and countryside. Huang Shouhong, a power industry analyst at Essence Securities, believes that China will have to spend up to 68 billion yuan ($10 billion) annually on smart grid development.  

 

China¡¯s Smart Meter Installation Estimate (by thousands)

Year

2009

2010

2012

2014

2016

2018

2020

Count

-

-

-

100

400

800

1,600

Cumulative Count

-

-

-

100

500

1,300

2,900

Source: Seed Planning     

 

India

The Indian government announced the Electricity Act of 2003; this aimed to improve the efficiency of the existing power distribution networks and add capacity for power generation. With an energy growth rate of 12% per year, power distribution has been a key issue in India and the Electricity Act was the first step towards reformation.  

The government has set forth the ¡®Power for All¡¯ plan, which requires an additional 1TW of capacity by 2012. India plans to expand its power infrastructure by over 100% by 2020 to meet the growing demand.  

Currently in India country¡¯s main power industry Reliance Energy has established smart meters in major cities like Mumbai and Delhi. On 2009 India¡¯s major power industries have initiated  partnerships with Google and PowerMeter. Starting May of 2009, Google¡¯s power meter has been implemented.

 

India intends to look into Smart Grid technologies to boost efficiency and reduce power losses. The government hopes to incorporate renewable energy into the formula; there is much potential for wind power in the south and the west, and India already receives about 5,000 trillion kWh of energy per year from solar radiation.  

The National Action Plan on Climate Change was announced in 2008, and it placed a significant emphasis on solar power and the National Solar Mission. The fluctuations from such large scale solar power generation would require a change in the current grid, and Smart Grids are being looked at.

 

Japan

Given the potential benefits of Smart Grid systems, the Japanese government has decided to launch a verification test for the Smart Grid as early as fiscal 2009. The Federation of Electric Power Companies of Japan is to develop a Smart Grid that incorporates solar power generation; this is to be completed by 2020.  

On July of 2009, Japan announced that Toshiba Corporation in conjunction with Toko Electric Corporation and the Tokyo Electric Power Company will work together to launch a venture into the commercialization of "smart meters," (advanced electricity measurement meters) equipped with advanced communication and other functions. Toshiba will work with Toko Electric in the design, development and production of these smart meters with the goal to eventually have them installed in households all across Tokyo Electric Power's service area starting in the fiscal year of 2013. 

In Japan, the expected solar power output is 53 million kW by 2030. To accommodate for such a large amount of power generated from solar energy, a Smart Grid system is vital. Japan¡¯s government is to invest about 10 billion yen ($104 million) with the U.S. The Japanese government has also announced a national Smart Metering initiative and large utilities companies announced Smart Grid programs to commence later this year. This demonstrates the strong drive towards smarter, more efficient power distribution systems in Japan.  

On March of 2010 Japan announced that a team of well known Japanese companies —Hitachi, Toshiba, Fuji, and Panasonic —plans to construct a working Smart Grid system in an unspecified New Mexico town by 2010. The effort is led by Japan¡¯s public research and development organization for environmental technologies, NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization). The Japanese government is expected to invest between $20.3 and $30.4 million in the project, which will include digital monitoring and distribution of power as well as solar power generation and storage. Following construction, the Japanese companies will retain ownership of the grid and control it in large part via the Internet.